Interest Rate Cutbacks Are Being Discussed Among Fed Officials

by Wall Street Rebel - Michael London | 11/25/2022 10:22 AM
Interest Rate Cutbacks Are Being Discussed Among Fed Officials

During their most recent meeting, the central bank members emphasized the need to reduce rate hikes shortly while suggesting that they are likely to boost borrowing costs further.

 

The minutes from the meeting in November reveal that participants at the Federal Reserve concluded that it would soon be appropriate to slow down the rises in interest rates. In the meantime, they redirected their attention to how high interest rates would inevitably increase.

At their meeting on November 1 and 2, central bankers decided to raise interest rates for the fourth time in a row by three-quarters of a percentage point. As a result, the federal funds rate is now close to 4 percent. As recently as March, interest rates were just slightly over zero.

To bring under control the rate of inflation, which is the highest it has been since the 1980s, the Federal Reserve has been waging the most fierce campaign to slow the economy it has waged in decades. The Federal Reserve's actions to adjust interest rates may reduce demand across the economy by making it more costly to borrow money. This makes it possible for supply and demand to become more evenly balanced, which in turn helps to temper price rises.

Subscribe 100% Free to Wall Street Rebel.com and receive access to investment tools worth $17,500!

However, policymakers are now arguing how much further effort is required to guarantee that inflation will be controlled. They aim to ensure that they go the extra mile by doing the following: If inflation is not brought under control immediately, it may become a more ingrained component of the American economy, making it far more difficult to eliminate it in the future. However, authorities aim to avoid doing more than is required to curb price rises since doing so might result in the loss of employment and a reduction in wages, which would leave people in a worse economic position overall.

Finding that happy medium will be a difficult task for the Federal Reserve. After years of pandemic shocks, the economy is functioning uniquely, and policymakers only have a few recent examples of periods of high inflation to use as guideposts for their decisions. Even though analysts have been caught off guard on many occasions over the previous 18 months by inflation's resilience, many economists believe that inflation will begin to decline in the next year as rent rises start to decrease and as demand for products begins to reduce.

Because of this, the authorities are considering taking it easier in the near future. They will be able to demonstrate that they are dedicated to combating inflation by gradually raising interest rates to a higher final level. At the same time, they will have more time to evaluate the efficacy of the actions they have taken up to this point.

According to the minutes of the meeting, "there was widespread agreement that increased uncertainty regarding the outlooks for both inflation and real activity underscored the importance of taking into account the cumulative tightening of monetary policy, the lags with which monetary policy affected economic activity and inflation, and the developments in economic and financial markets."

The minutes did not make it obvious when the central bank would scale down its rate rises; nonetheless, investors predict it might drop down to a half-point move next month.

Moving more gradually might "lower the risk of instability in the financial system," according to comments made by "a few" Fed officials at the meeting. This is in addition to providing authorities with more time to observe how policies are playing out. However, some other participants held the opinion that it could be preferable to delay lowering the speed of rate rises until after they reached an even greater level.

Officials have indicated that they are likely to hike interest rates more than they had predicted as recently as September, with some estimating that rates may reach 5% or higher. In November, Federal Reserve officials underlined that it is not the speed but rather the essential objective. Fed officials underscored in November that it is the most important destination, whatever the pace.

How high rates rise and how long they stay high "had become more important considerations for achieving the Committee's goals than the pace of further increases," the minutes showed, referring to the Federal Open Market Committee, which directs monetary policy. "Participants agreed that communicating this distinction to the public was important in order to reinforce the Committee's strong commitment to returning inflation to the 2 percent objective."

Since the Fed last met, new inflation data has suggested that price increases may finally turn a corner. Consumer Price Index data showed that inflation faded to 7.7 percent in the year through October, down from 8.2 percent previously, as some prices of goods sank into outright decline.

Given how much the Fed has raised interest rates this year, many economists expect consumer spending and the labor market to cool down heading into 2023, which could help prices to moderate further.

But so far, the economy is proving fairly hardy. Consumer spending is slowing somewhat, but it is not falling off a cliff.

Demand for workers remains strong, and wages continue to rise, factors that have prompted many Fed officials to say that they have more work to do when it comes to slowing the economy — even as the minutes showed that "some" central bankers have begun to warn that the risk of overdoing monetary policy tightening has increased.

As the economy continues to show signs of being relatively resilient, officials have indicated that they are likely to hike interest rates to a greater level than they had predicted as recently as September. Several officials have speculated that rates may rise to 5 percent or even higher.

The minutes of the Federal Open Market Committee, which is responsible for directing monetary policy, showed that how high-interest rates rise and how long they remain high "had become more important considerations for achieving the Committee's goals than the pace of further increases." "Participants reached a consensus that it was vital to communicate this difference to the public to underline the Committee's strong commitment to bringing inflation back down to the 2 percent target."

Subscribe 100% Free to Wall Street Rebel.com and receive access to investment tools worth $17,500!

Since the last meeting of the Fed, new inflation data has provided evidence that price hikes may soon be beginning to turn the corner. The figures from the Consumer Price Index revealed that inflation slowed to 7.7 percent in the year through October, down from 8.2 percent in the prior year.

Many experts anticipate a slowdown in consumer spending and the labor market moving into 2023 due to the Federal Reserve's decision to boost interest rates to historically high levels this year. This might contribute to a further moderation in price levels.

However, things seem to be holding up rather well for the economy thus far. The growth rate in consumer spending is somewhat decreasing but not precipitously declining.

Even though the minutes showed that "some" central bankers have begun to warn that the risk of overdoing monetary policy tightening has increased, many Fed officials have stated that they have more work to do when it comes to slowing the economy. These factors have caused many Fed officials to say that they have more work to do to slow the economy.

 

                       Fed hints at smaller interest rate hikes "soon"

Latest News

Stay Up to Date With The Latest
News & Updates

Join Our Newsletter



GET THE NEWSLETTER

Rebel Yell Morning Market Report
Market Alerts
Offers from us
Offers from our trusted partners

Follow Us

Connect with us on social media

Facebook Twitter